Posted in Love Poems, poem, poems, poetry, Uncategorized

Vesak 4

full, moon

The drapery of monks
Yellow, amber, orange, saffron,
The many colors akin to a full chalice of light,
The cynosure of a night, while stars look like
They could use a little attention, while the moon lets
Eyes be drawn towards her,
Just like a visiting child in the temple,
Looking at a bald child monk draped,
In a saffron robe, as their eyes meet, while their temples
Seem poles apart, one with thick wavy hair,
And the other given a clean shave,
And below both lie, pandols of neurons and synapses
Firing at will. The transcendence of light
To the other side of the eye, to a meditation of beauty.
How some lessons in life, are learnt outside the classroom,
Like what beauty lies, in people, gathering in throngs,
Near a giant Vesak pandol, where Lord Buddha,
Can be seen in the lotus position,
While far far away lies a near perfect aureole,
Yellow with a faint glow of amber,
Surrounding the silhouette of a rabbit,
The face of the moon, playing peekaboo,
From behind candy floss clouds.

Author:

Dr Dilantha Gunawardana graduated from the University of Melbourne, as a molecular biologist, and moonlights as a poet. He currently serves as a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Botany, University of Sri Jayewardenepura. Dilantha lives in a chimeric universe of science and poetry. Dilantha’s poems have been accepted for publication /published in HeartWood Literary Magazine, Canary Literary Magazine, Boston Accent, Forage, Kitaab, Eastlit, American Journal of Poetry, Zingara Poetry Review, The Wagon and Ravens Perch, among others. Dilantha too has two anthologies of poetry, 'Kite Dreams' (2016) and 'Driftwood' (2017), both brought to the readership by Sarasavi Publishers, and is working on his third poetry collection (The Many Constellations of Home). Dilantha’s pet areas of teaching and research, include, Nitrogen Fixation, RNA biology, Phytoremediation, Agricultural Biology, and Bioethics & Biosafety. Dilantha blogs at – https://meandererworld.wordpress.com/ -, where he has nearly 2000 poems.

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